102018Oct

Is carpal tunnel a permanent disability?

There are many issues that contribute to wrist and hand problems, and a lot of them are temporary or not serious. There are also some that are more significant, and that can lead to long-term issues. In order to reduce the chances of these problems and address issues quickly and efficiently, you can get a free hand screening to look for concerns that may be getting started in your hands or wrists. One of those concerns is carpal tunnel, which can make it difficult to use your hands without stiffness, numbness, and tingling. Over time, this also causes weakened muscles and atrophy, as well as permanent nerve damage.

What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

When the nerve that goes from the forearm to the palm of the hand gets compressed as it goes through the base of the palm near the wrist, that causes numbness and tingling which is primarily felt in the index and middle fingers, as well as the thumb. Muscle atrophy is another symptom of this condition, which can make the hand weaker over time. Without proper treatment, the fingers can end up in a clawing position, and many of the options for improving the condition, such as wrist braces and steroid injections, don’t correct the problem. Symptoms may improve, but they will generally worsen again. Because of that, surgical intervention is a necessary step in most cases.

The carpal tunnel is the name of the area where the nerve travels through the base of the palm, and the inflamed or thickened tendons in that area are what causes the compression of the nerve. The numbness and tingling are sometimes manageable depending on their severity, but the loss of movement and the atrophy of the muscles are much more significant. Most jobs, along with the majority of daily life tasks, require the use of hands and fingers that respond to signals from the brain. If the nerves aren’t allowing those signals through, a lot of problems can arise. Without treatment, these can become permanent.

There Are Options for Hand and Wrist Pain Treatment

In many cases, carpal tunnel is a permanent disability for which a person can qualify to receive benefits. In other cases, it can be treated and managed to reduce problems. Surgery is generally the right choice for most patients because they aren’t going to see any kind of long-term improvement without it. Talking to your doctor about options and a free hand screening is a good first step. Many people let the problems caused by carpal tunnel go on for a long time before they seek treatment, but the sooner you reach out for help the better off you’ll be when it comes to getting the right level of intervention to improve the function of your hand.