142019Nov

The Most Common Causes of Wrist Fractures

Wrist fractures are extremely painful and debilitating. If you’ve broken your wrist, don’t delay treatment. The wrist consists of eight small bones that connect to the two bones in the forearm, the radius and ulna. Although any of those bones can break, resulting in a wrist fracture, fractures most commonly occur in the lower end of the larger of the two forearm bones, the distal radius.  Such a break, known as a distal radius fracture, typically results when we attempt to stop a fall with an outstretched hand while skiing or snowboarding, or when we suffer a powerful blow to the wrist, such as in a car accident. People with…

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102019Sep

Can You Treat a Ganglion Cyst at Home?

Ganglion cysts are bumps on the wrist that rarely cause discomfort. But if they do, they’re easily treated with at-home remedies. Have you noticed a lump on your wrist? It could be a ganglion cyst. Sprouting along the tendons of the wrist, a noncancerous, fluid-filled ganglion cyst is typically quite small — usually less than an inch wide — and has an oval or round shape. Ganglion cysts have no definitive cause, although they tend to form when fluid builds up in the tissues around a tendon or joint, resulting in a nodule. The condition is most common among women between 20 and 40, people with osteoarthritis in their top…

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132019Aug

What is Dupuytren’s Contracture?

An orthopedic condition affecting the fingers and hand, Dupuytren’s contracture progresses so slowly that many people are unaware they have it until its later stages. In the condition’s advanced stages, patients may have extremely bent fingers, and they’ll likely experience difficulty doing everyday activities such as shaking hands, putting on gloves, and handling large objects. In its earliest phase, Dupuytren’s contracture shows up as lumps of tissue under the skin of the palm of the hand. Patients may also notice a dimpling of the skin. According to the Dupuytren Research Group, about 15 million Americans aged 35 or over have the disorder if those experiencing early signs are counted. As…

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12019Aug

Dorsal Wrist Pain: When Pain in the Back of Your Wrist Is a Cause for Concern

A common orthopedic complaint among gymnasts, yoga practitioners, and even non-athletes, pain along the back of the wrist is known medically as dorsal wrist impingement syndrome, a condition that arises when the lining of the joint, or capsule, becomes inflamed and thickens. Specifically, the inflammation is located in the capsule between the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon, a forearm muscle that controls the wrist, and the scaphoid bone, one of the carpal bones on the thumb side of the wrist between the hand and forearm. When the capsule is inflamed, individuals typically experience a pinching pain when the wrist is bent backward. That’s most likely because repeated extensions of the…

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12019Aug

Why Do Pregnant Women Have Finger Joint Pain?

It’s not uncommon for pregnant women to experience pain and tingling sensations in their fingers and hands. In fact, according to one study, about a third of all pregnant women exhibited the classic symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a condition in which the compressed median nerve running from the neck to the wrist causes stiffness and swelling in the hands, fingers, and wrists. These symptoms most often arise in the second or third trimester, as fluid builds up in the tissues and joints in the wrist and hand. This excess fluid puts pressure on the median nerve, with the pain concentrated in the first and middle fingers in the…

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272019Jun

If Gout Is On Its Way Back, What Does That Mean for Your Wrists?

A form of arthritis, gout affects some 8.3 million people, or 4%, of the U.S. population, according to a 2011 study. That percentage represents an increase over the past two decades, which begs the question: why are incidences of gout increasing? While diet appears to be the primary factor, other circumstances — chiefly, genetics — may be a significant influence as well.  During a gout attack, joints suddenly swell, become painful, and feel warm. Although gout mainly strikes toes, ankles, and knees, gout can cause those same symptoms in wrists and fingers as well. Men have higher rates of gout than women. If you suffer from pain and swelling in…

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132019Jun

If Your Hands Are Numb, This Might Be Why

Numbness in the hand and fingers can be quite debilitating, especially if you work with your hands. Simple tasks such as typing at a computer, turning a doorknob, or pulling out a credit card become difficult and painful. So, naturally, many patients who are dealing with these types of symptoms want to find out what the cause is. The truth is, a variety of disorders may be the source of the numbness and tingly sensations in your hand, and determining the exact cause will likely require the intervention of a specialist. That said, you can expect your hand numbness to stem from one of these medical conditions. What’s Causing Your…

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